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Elements by Solomon Deep

Friday, July 3, 2015
book review, fiction, contemporary, On My Kindle

Alan, an aspiring writer, is disillusioned with his life. He and his girlfriend, Jane, are always arguing; he thinks that the current college courses he is taking are a waste of time; he works a dead-end job at the local 24-hour diner; his mother, an alcoholic and drug addict, calls him whenever she has a psychotic episode; and Alan’s main source of inspiration is a television evangelist, Charles Hobbeston. Alan finally decides that he’s had enough; he breaks up with Jane, and leaves without any particular destination in mind to focus on his writing.

I have been compensated by Bookplex for an honest review of this book. Also, this post contains affiliate links. I will receive a commission for any items that you purchase when you follow these links.

Alan begins his journey by meandering aimlessly along the East coast of the United States searching for a purpose and inspiration. After watching a news report about the kidnapping of Charles Hobbeston’s wife, Alan decides to go on a pilgrimage of sorts to see Charles Hobbeston in Las Vegas.

This journey takes Alan on an adventure in which he meets all sorts of different people from all walks of life; each of these chance meetings inspire Alan to write so that his adventures are immortalized. When Alan finally meets Charles Hobbeston he realizes that the whole outfit is nothing but a big sham, and he suspects that Hobbeston played a part in his wife's kidnapping.

2-star review, On My Kindle

In order for me to really enjoy a book like this, I need to be able to like one of the main characters. In the case of Elements, I did not like Alan. I thought that he was a bit of a jerk; I would have broken it off with him well before he ended the relationship, and I felt that Jane was better off without him.

I also failed to see that Alan actually achieved enlightenment. Instead I saw Alan as an egomaniac that suffers from emotional highs during which he is intensely creative, and lows that prevent him from being inspired. The times that Alan’s egomania seems subdued is when others go out of their way to demonstrate to him just how great he is, or he is severely injured and in need of assistance.

Finally, the book ended on an unrealistically good note. I found this ending hard to believe given that Alan’s cycle of self-destructive and egomaniacal behavior is likely reassert itself in the future.

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I have been compensated by Bookplex for an honest review of this book. Also, this post contains affiliate links. I will receive a commission for any items that you purchase when you follow these links.
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